Venus Fly Trap Care

The Venus Flytrap’s Seasonal Leaves

Venus flytraps tend to produce two types of leaves: spring-summer leaves and summer-autumn leaves. Before we describe the details, you need to know a little terminology. The trapping part of a leaf (the part that looks like a clam) is called the lamina or leaf-blade. The long leafy part that connects the lamina to the ground is called the leaf-base. (A third leaf part, the petiole, is the little post that connects the leaf base to the lamina. Some...

The Venus Fly Trap: A Guide for Growing and Keeping Dionaea

The Venus flytrap (Venus's fly trap, or Venus fly trap) is native to only the coastal bogs of North and South Carolina. In the wild, it grows in very sandy nutrient-poor soil with constant water seepage. The plant thrives primarily along the margins of bogs where the soil is always damp. It is also considered an opportunist plant, populating open spaces created by wildfire. However, due of fire suppression in the region, other vegetation often outcompetes and crowds out...

Registered Venus Flytrap Cultivars

Over the past few decades, at least 3 dozen cultivars of the Venus flytrap have been created. The majority of these cultivars belong to the Dionaea group- these cultivars all have traps with tooth or triangular-like structures to capture prey. A good number of these cultivars can be found in nurseries and flower shops, but because of the demand for these plants, many remain sold out. At present, the registered cultivars include the following: Dionaea muscipula 'Akai Ryu' (Japanese...

Official VenusFlytrap.com Care Sheet, Part 2

Light: Venus Flytraps need strong light. They can be grown indoors next to a very sunny window where sunlight can visibly shine on the plant for 4 hours or more each day. The bottom center of a window is usually the brightest spot. THERE SHOULD BE NO SCREENING, closed or open blinds, tinting, a large tree, or an overhang on or in front of the window your VFT is receiving light through. The bottom center of a window is usually the...

Official VenusFlytrap.com Care Sheet, Part 1

Venus Flytrap care Sheet page 1 It is extremely important that the care sheet directions that come with your plant are strictly followed. If you have plans to grow your plant in a different way, or with a different soil or a different pot, or have read different care information online or in a book I strongly urge you not do this and to strictly follow the care sheet direction instead. I strongly recommend not using carnivorous plant soil purchased...

Should I Feed My Venus Flytrap Live or Dead Foods?

While it is nice to have an exotic plant like the Venus flytrap, it is also important to know how to care for and feed this carnivorous plant. Prematurely buying this tropic plant before knowing about its feeding habits will lead to its premature demise. So if you are considering buying a Venus flytrap or have just bought this plant, here are few things about its unique feeding habits that you should know. Just like any other plant, the...

The Venus Flytrap’s Native Habitat

The Venus Flytrap habitat, contrary to popular opinion, is decidedly not tropical. Yes, the native plants are subject to hot and humid weather, but as the folks in the coastal regions of South and North Carolina can attest to, they also get some very cool weather in the winter, including the occasional freezing temperatures and snowfall. Venus Flytrap native habitat is located in USDA Hardiness Zone 8b, with an average annual minimum temperature of 10 to 15 degrees F (-9.5...

Fun Facts About the Venus Flytrap

There are several strange but true Venus Flytrap facts that are worth telling. The Venus Flytrap plant, unlike most plants, actively seeks insects, not to pollinate, but to feed on! You see, Venus Flytrap plants grow in soils that are poor in nutrients. And Venus Flytraps catch insects and digest them for the nutrients that they cannot get from soil. Here are a few interesting facts about Venus Flytraps: Venus Flytrap plants are not tropical plants. Venus Flytrap plants are native to North...

Venus Flytrap Care

Venus flytraps are not hard to care for. Venus flytrap care is really easy, as long as you don't over complicate it. And as long as you pay attention to a few "do's" and "don'ts". Your Venus Flytrap is just like your other potted house plants - it needs the right kind of soil, lots of light, and water. But the conditions that Venus Flytraps really like is a little different than your average house plant. If you bought a small...

Growing Venus Flytraps From Seeds

Growing a Venus Flytrap from Venus Flytrap seeds is not for the beginner. Although many North American plants can be easily grown and cultivated from seeds, the Venus Flytrap plant is a little more difficult. The Venus Flytrap produces a small white flower in the spring, typically in April through May. The flower produces small seeds that can be used to grow new Venus Flytrap plants. So Venus Flytrap seeds are usually available at pretty good prices in June and July. Remember...